Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Awareness

Sixteen years ago, September 9 was recognized as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders FASD Awareness Day. This day, the 9th day of the 9th month, symbolizes the 9-months of pregnancy that a woman should remain alcohol free. Over the last decade, awareness efforts have grown and September is now set aside as International FASD month.

FASD is an umbrella term describing the range of effects a person can experience as a result of alcohol exposure prior to birth.  Statistics are alarming, it is estimated that approximately 40,000 babies are born each year with FASD.

FASD is a 100% Preventable Condition

No amount of alcohol is proven safe to use during pregnancy.  Vital development happens at each stage of pregnancy, even early in the first trimester. The damaging effects from alcohol could happen prior to being aware of pregnancy.  A person who is pregnant, or at risk of becoming pregnant, should stop using alcohol immediately and seek assistance if help is needed.  Every type of alcohol should be completely avoided during pregnancy, even red wine.  A standard serving of most wine has as much alcohol as a shot of hard liquor or standard bottle of beer.

The St. Louis Arc’s Go the Whole 9 campaign spreads awareness of FASD throughout the year. We hope you will join us this September in paying honor to those living with FASD by spreading the important and consistent message that no amount of any type of alcohol is safe to use anytime during a pregnancy.

For questions, resources, or to schedule a speaker or display, please visit www.thewhole9.org or call us toll free at 877-946-5364. Together we can make a real impact!

The St. Louis Arc is a member of The Missouri Affiliate of the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. 

 

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